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Healthy Skin With Protein

Healthy Skin With Protein

Healthy Skin With Protein

Good Day y’all! For those following along, this month I am discussing all things protein!


Adequate protein intake is absolutely essential for maintaining skin integrity. 


Research has shown that suboptimal protein intake is a cause of skin breakdown that can lead to severe wounds in the elderly or immobile. 


Protein is needed for preserving the structure and elasticity of the skin as it's an key ingredient to produce collagen and elastin.


Likewise, the type of protein you eat may offer even more beneficial nutrients for your skin. 

Good Day y’all! For those following along, this month I am discussing all things protein!


Adequate protein intake is absolutely essential for maintaining skin integrity. 


Research has shown that suboptimal protein intake is a cause of skin breakdown that can lead to severe wounds in the elderly or immobile. 


Protein is needed for preserving the structure and elasticity of the skin as it's an key ingredient to produce collagen and elastin.


Likewise, the type of protein you eat may offer even more beneficial nutrients for your skin. 

Good Day y’all! For those following along, this month I am discussing all things protein!


Adequate protein intake is absolutely essential for maintaining skin integrity. 


Research has shown that suboptimal protein intake is a cause of skin breakdown that can lead to severe wounds in the elderly or immobile. 


Protein is needed for preserving the structure and elasticity of the skin as it's an key ingredient to produce collagen and elastin.


Likewise, the type of protein you eat may offer even more beneficial nutrients for your skin. 

Protein in the food we eat is broken down in amino acids and absorbed by our intestine. The body then uses these amino acids to build collagen and elastin, the proteins that keep our skin firm and elastic!


Some amino acids can be made by our bodies. Others, called essential amino acids, cannot by synthesized in the body and must be consumed through foods.

Complete VS Incomplete

Complete VS Incomplete

Complete VS Incomplete

Protein can be broken down into two groups, complete or incomplete. 


A complete protein contains every essential amino acid our body needs. Animal proteins, come from… you guessed it! Animals, and include meat, eggs, and dairy. Every animal protein is complete 

Protein can be broken down into two groups, complete or incomplete. 


A complete protein contains every essential amino acid our body needs. Animal proteins, come from… you guessed it! Animals, and include meat, eggs, and dairy. Every animal protein is complete 

Protein can be broken down into two groups, complete or incomplete. 


A complete protein contains every essential amino acid our body needs. Animal proteins, come from… you guessed it! Animals, and include meat, eggs, and dairy. Every animal protein is complete 

Incomplete proteins are missing one or more essential amino acids. This does not mean incomplete proteins are in anyway inferior to complete proteins. 


Most plant proteins are incomplete, and come from beans, nuts, vegetables, and grains. However, some plant-based proteins, like quinoa, are complete proteins. Consuming a variety of plant-protein sources ensures you receive every essential amino acid your body needs.


The amount of protein we should be consuming each day varies from each individual and depends on the types of proteins you are consuming. 


A person has to consume more grams of an incomplete protein to get the same amount of essential amino acids they would from less grams of a complete protein. 


The ACND recommends 0.8g/kg per day. This recommendation is based on the assumption that an individual is eating a good variety of complete and incomplete proteins.

Incomplete proteins are missing one or more essential amino acids. This does not mean incomplete proteins are in anyway inferior to complete proteins. 


Most plant proteins are incomplete, and come from beans, nuts, vegetables, and grains. However, some plant-based proteins, like quinoa, are complete proteins. Consuming a variety of plant-protein sources ensures you receive every essential amino acid your body needs.


The amount of protein we should be consuming each day varies from each individual and depends on the types of proteins you are consuming. 


A person has to consume more grams of an incomplete protein to get the same amount of essential amino acids they would from less grams of a complete protein. 

Incomplete proteins are missing one or more essential amino acids. This does not mean incomplete proteins are in anyway inferior to complete proteins. 


Most plant proteins are incomplete, and come from beans, nuts, vegetables, and grains. However, some plant-based proteins, like quinoa, are complete proteins. Consuming a variety of plant-protein sources ensures you receive every essential amino acid your body needs.


The amount of protein we should be consuming each day varies from each individual and depends on the types of proteins you are consuming. 


A person has to consume more grams of an incomplete protein to get the same amount of essential amino acids they would from less grams of a complete protein. 

The ACND recommends 0.8g/kg per day. This recommendation is based on the assumption that an individual is eating a good variety of complete and incomplete proteins.


If you are consuming all your protein from complete sources, then you may not need to eat as much as recommended. If the opposite is true, and you are consuming all your protein from plant sources, then you will need to eat 1.5-2 times the recommended amount of protein.


The ACND recommends 0.8g/kg per day. This recommendation is based on the assumption that an individual is eating a good variety of complete and incomplete proteins.


If you are consuming all your protein from complete sources, then you may not need to eat as much as recommended. If the opposite is true, and you are consuming all your protein from plant sources, then you will need to eat 1.5-2 times the recommended amount of protein.


THERE IS A THING AS TOO MUCH PROTEIN!

THERE IS A THING AS 

TOO MUCH PROTEIN!

THERE IS A THING AS TOO MUCH PROTEIN!

Have you ever read the nutrition label on some of those post-work out drinks, 50+ grams of protein per serving? 


This is probably overdoing it for most of us. Research suggests an individual can only absorb about 30g of protein from one eating occurrence. 


While consuming more than this is not necessarily harmful, if you are purchasing expensive products you may be wasting your money on excessive protein your body cannot utilize. 


ALL PROTEIN IS NOT CREATED EQUAL! Recent trend diets, like The Paleo Diet, have emphasized the importance of protein without distinguishing between the types. 

Have you ever read the nutrition label on some of those post-work out drinks, 50+ grams of protein per serving? 


This is probably overdoing it for most of us. Research suggests an individual can only absorb about 30g of protein from one eating occurrence.


ALL PROTEIN IS NOT CREATED EQUAL! 

Have you ever read the nutrition label on some of those post-work out drinks, 50+ grams of protein per serving? 


This is probably overdoing it for most of us. Research suggests an individual can only absorb about 30g of protein from one eating occurrence.


ALL PROTEIN IS NOT CREATED EQUAL! 

While consuming more than this is not necessarily harmful, if you are purchasing expensive products you may be wasting your money on excessive protein your body cannot utilize. 


Recent trend diets, like The Paleo Diet, have emphasized the importance of protein without distinguishing between the types.

While consuming more than this is not necessarily harmful, if you are purchasing expensive products you may be wasting your money on excessive protein your body cannot utilize. 


Recent trend diets, like The Paleo Diet, have emphasized the importance of protein without distinguishing between the types.

This has contributed to a myth that complete, or animal, protein is somehow superior, giving individuals the freedom to eat as much red meat and bacon as they desire, both of which have been linked to increased colorectal cancer risk. 


The truth is that while they may be complete, some animal protein sources are also high in saturated fat, cholesterol, and carcinogens. Whereas, plant proteins are high in fiber and anti-oxidants. This does not mean you shouldn’t consume animal protein. However, most Americans eat more than the recommended intake of protein and less than the recommended intakes for vegetables and wholegrains.

This has contributed to a myth that complete, or animal, protein is somehow superior, giving individuals the freedom to eat as much red meat and bacon as they desire, both of which have been linked to increased colorectal cancer risk. 


The truth is that while they may be complete, some animal protein sources are also high in saturated fat, cholesterol, and carcinogens. Whereas, plant proteins are high in fiber and anti-oxidants. 


This does not mean you shouldn’t consume animal protein. However, most Americans eat more than the recommended intake of protein and less than the recommended intakes for vegetables and wholegrains.

This has contributed to a myth that complete, or animal, protein is somehow superior, giving individuals the freedom to eat as much red meat and bacon as they desire, both of which have been linked to increased colorectal cancer risk. 


The truth is that while they may be complete, some animal protein sources are also high in saturated fat, cholesterol, and carcinogens. Whereas, plant proteins are high in fiber and anti-oxidants. This does not mean you shouldn’t consume animal protein. However, most Americans eat more than the recommended intake of protein and less than the recommended intakes for vegetables and wholegrains.

PROTEIN TIPS TO FOLLOW:

PROTEIN TIPS TO FOLLOW:

PROTEIN TIPS 

TO FOLLOW:

Try making plant-based proteins the focus of your dish instead of that steak or pork.Good sources of plant-based protein include beans, legumes, nuts, and soy.


Non-starchy vegetables contain about 2g protein per serving and are naturally low in calories.


Grains and starchy vegetables contain about 1-3g of protein per serving. Pick whole grain sources most often.


Choose leaner sources of animal proteins, like poultry, fish, or eggs, most often, and let the animal protein be the side dish.


Select white meat over dark and remove the skin to reduce the saturated fat content. Check out some of these recipes for inspiration!

Try making plant-based proteins the focus of your dish instead of that steak or pork.Good sources of plant-based protein include beans, legumes, nuts, and soy.


Non-starchy vegetables contain about 2g protein per serving and are naturally low in calories.


Grains and starchy vegetables contain about 1-3g of protein per serving. Pick whole grain sources most often.

Try making plant-based proteins the focus of your dish instead of that steak or pork.Good sources of plant-based protein include beans, legumes, nuts, and soy.


Non-starchy vegetables contain about 2g protein per serving and are naturally low in calories.


Grains and starchy vegetables contain about 1-3g of protein per serving. Pick whole grain sources most often.

Chicken Parm Bake- 34g of Protein per Serving

Honey Garlic Shrimp- 22g of Protein per Serving

Caribbean Chickpea Curry- 10g of Protein per Serving

Spinach and Egg Muffins - 9g of Protein per Muffin

Choose leaner sources of animal proteins, like poultry, fish, or eggs, most often, and let the animal protein be the side dish.


Select white meat over dark and remove the skin to reduce the saturated fat content. Check out some of these recipes for inspiration!

Choose leaner sources of animal proteins, like poultry, fish, or eggs, most often, and let the animal protein be the side dish.


Select white meat over dark and remove the skin to reduce the saturated fat content. Check out some of these recipes for inspiration!

Chicken Parm Bake- 34g of Protein per Serving

Honey Garlic Shrimp- 22g of Protein per Serving

Caribbean Chickpea Curry- 10g of Protein per Serving

Spinach and Egg Muffins - 9g of Protein per Muffin

Chicken Parm Bake- 34g of Protein per Serving

Honey Garlic Shrimp- 22g of Protein per Serving

Caribbean Chickpea Curry- 10g of Protein per Serving

Spinach and Egg Muffins - 9g of Protein per Muffin

DID YOU KNOW?

The anti-oxidants available in plant protein sources may have an added positive effect on your skin complexion by reducing free radicals? Check back next month for my post diving into the relationship between anti-oxidants and your skin!    

More On Live Beautiful:


Meet Ayla

DID YOU KNOW?

The anti-oxidants available in plant protein sources may have an added positive effect on your skin complexion by reducing free radicals? Check back next month for my post diving into the relationship between anti-oxidants and your skin!    

DID YOU KNOW?

The anti-oxidants available in plant protein sources may have an added positive effect on your skin complexion by reducing free radicals?


Check back next month for my post diving into the relationship between anti-oxidants and your skin!    

More On Live Beautiful:


Meet Ayla